Browsing Posts published by Helen Avis

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Brain Science Podcasts is a site managed by Dr. Ginger Campbell, an emergency room doctor with a particular interest in neuroscience. The site contains a plethora of episodes featuring interviews with specialists, accompanying resources, transcripts, and links to neuroscience news. The best part is that all of the medical jargon has been removed; students and teachers will find it easy to understand and very entertaining. Hover over the “Resources” link on the top right, select “Categories” from the drop-down menu, and find a podcast that meets your curricular needs. These podcasts are a great option for biology and health students independently expanding their understanding of the brain, or teachers and students performing research.

 

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Biteslide is fun, free, and easy way for students and teachers to create slidebooks. These are creative and fun online books where teachers and students can share their work through text, images, videos and much more. Students add in their own text but can upload and import images and videos from their computer or the web. There is a feature called “the nibbler” that once downloaded helps students find content to add into their slidebook. This is a new and exciting way to encourage creativity and higher-order thinking skills through the creation of a new product to check for student understanding.

TEDEd

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Looking for a new way to engage students, or an exciting way to teach a difficult concept? Wish you could take your students on an impossible field trip? Checkout TEDEd: Lessons Worth Sharing for access to an innovative lesson planning tool. TedEd is linked to YouTube videos appropriate for school-age students and searchable by subject area and content. Use the search feature to find a video; add short answer or multiple choice questions, discussion points, and further references throughout the video. Hit the exclude option to hide any of these options. If you would like to see an already completed lesson search their library of “flipped videos” and modify them to fit your needs. This is an easy-to-use, free resource with limitless possibilities for educators.

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Newsmap

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Screen Shot 2013-09-17 at 12.20.15 PMnewsmap is an amazing site full of up-to-date news articles and videos from around the world. Simply click the country of interest at the top of the page and the latest current events from reputable sources, such as CNN, ABC News, the Miami Herald, and the Washington Post will appear. The larger the font, the more popular the articles are, according to a Google algorithm. Stories are color-coded to indicate categories such as business, technology, and sports. News displays in the language of the country of origin, making this is a great way to engage ESL students and help them maintain their native language.

MapWant to show students what the world looked like when Shakespeare wrote Romeo and Juliet? Or when the Spanish explorers sailed the Atlantic? Visit the David Rumsey Historical Map Collection for more that 100,000 historical maps searchable by area, time period, and even cartographer. The fastest way to find a map that meets your needs is to hover over View Collection at the top of the page, then use the LUNA browser that will search through 30,000 maps. If you don’t find what you’re looking for there, search the whole site using the search box at the top right of the page. You’ll find a variety of amazing maps.

bubbl.us

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bubbl

Looking for a new way to mindmap with your students? bubbl.us is a free, easy to use brainstorming site. The homepage links to a fast introduction called Learn how to use bubbl.us, but the site is fairly intuitive so you may want to explore it and use the Help feature if you have a problem. A Save feature allows you to save multiple concept webs as single files or within multiple folders. Using this tool, you can assign each class section or topic a folder that can later be combined to form one large brainstorming web. You can save the mindmaps as a .jpeg and import them into a Word document or print them directly from the site.